Caddo burial mounds in Texas hint at American Indian history

A winding highway, that was once part of the El Camino Real de los Tejas, southwest out of Alto, Texas leads to the Caddo Mounds state historic site. This is one place where a community of Caddo Indians thrived centuries before Christopher Columbus “discovered” the New World.

The site, formerly owned and operated by the state park system, now is under the operation of the Texas Historical Commission.

Caddo Mounds was first opened to the public in 1982, but the site had been explored and mapped by archaeologists since 1919, who have uncovered many artifacts and details of this particular group of Caddos known as the Hasinai.

Archaeologists have determined the Hasinai moved into the area about 900 A.D. and quickly established their presence by building the first ceremonial mound and a burial mound, where the remains of many Caddos still lie beneath tons of earth.

An excavation of the burial mound in 1970 provided a window into the culture of the group. After the study, the mound was recovered and none of the remains were displaced.

The ceremonial grounds played a large part in the Caddo culture and due to the parent group of Caddos in East Texas maintaining their political and economic relationship with other Caddos, the site in Cherokee County became a major regional trade center.

During the Late Caddoan Era, many of the Caddos’ ceremonial rites were discontinued, which scientists believe shows a weakening of the old social structure and values. With the loss of ceremonial rites, the site near Alto was abandoned as Caddos moved to other locations sometime around 1700.

The Cherokee County site consists of two temple mounds, a burial mound and a large portion of the adjacent village area.

“Part of the El Camino Real has actually been found on the site and soon we will open an area to the public where they will be able to see actual wagon wheel ruts from early travelers passing through the area,” Price said.

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20 Responses to Caddo burial mounds in Texas hint at American Indian history

  1. Thanks for this update.Before reading this post i wasn’t aware of the Caddos.From this post we are able to get a picture of the group,how they lived etc.With the opening of the area,the public will get a better insight of the community and other details associated with them.Look forward to hearing from you soon again.

  2. Before reading this post i wasn’t aware of the Caddos.Look forward to hearing from you soon again.The Cherokee County site consists of two temple mounds, a burial mound and a large portion of the adjacent village area.Thanks for this update.With the opening of the area,the public will get a better insight of the community and other details associated with them.From this post we are able to get a picture of the group,how they lived etc.

  3. Before reading this post i wasn’t aware of the Caddos.With the opening of the area,the public will get a better insight of the community and other details associated with them.Look forward to hearing from you soon again.Before reading this post i wasn’t aware of the Caddos.Thanks for this update.From this post we are able to get a picture of the group,how they lived etc.

    With the opening of the area,the public will get a better insight of the community and other details associated with them.Thanks for this update.The Cherokee County site consists of two temple mounds, a burial mound and a large portion of the adjacent village area.From this post we are able to get a picture of the group,how they lived etc.

    Look forward to hearing from you soon again.The site, formerly owned and operated by the state park system, now is under the operation of the Texas Historical Commission.
    Before reading this post i wasn’t aware of the Caddos.With the opening of the area,the public will get a better insight of the community and other details associated with them.Look forward to hearing from you soon again.Before reading this post i wasn’t aware of the Caddos.Thanks for this update.From this post we are able to get a picture of the group,how they lived etc.With the opening of the area,the public will get a better insight of the community and other details associated with them.Thanks for this update.The Cherokee County site consists of two temple mounds, a burial mound and a large portion of the adjacent village area.From this post we are able to get a picture of the group,how they lived etc.Look forward to hearing from you soon again.The site, formerly owned and operated by the state park system, now is under the operation of the Texas Historical Commission.

  4. Unterricht says:

    We prefer to learn American Indian history from American Indians. Who can tell the stories better?

    It’s not that we do not trust versions told by the dominate culture, though there are many examples of our history erroneously reported or deliberately altered to fit the invader’s own views.

    Granted, many worthwhile texts are available from honest and well-intended scholars who attempt to truthfully report the past. Most however, are woefully lacking in Spirit. Our stories are filled with Spirit because it gives them meaning and purpose. One must see a man’s heart to know him. It is seldom we read versions of our history that touch the heart and inspire our children. Few public and private schools today teach ‘real’ American Indian history. Less than a handful teach it from the Indian perspective. Why?

    The telling of stories is the essence of our culture. We must respect our ancestors and learn their stories to keep our ways alive for the sake of our children’s children.

    Encourage schools in your area to emphasize American Indian history. Ask them to teach more than just Colonial and Indian Wars periods. Ask them to order books and other teaching material written from the Indian perspective!

    Is there nothing to learn from American Indian sciences of ecology, botany, astronomy, math or medicine? Is there nothing to learn from American Indian art, poetry, music and dance? Is there nothing to learn from our deep and enduring philosophy?

  5. I enjoyed reading your articles. That is actually a terrific read for me. I have bookmarked it and I’m wanting ahead to reading new articles. Keep up the great work! This post is precisely what I am interested. sustain the good work. we need more good statements.

  6. The religious social group or social class, the tribe consisted of xinesi, or leader, whose words came directly from the gods. The priests interpreted the meanings and ensured all religious ceremonies. The shaman was a medicine man, healer, and handled the day-to-day running of the tribe.
    The Caddoan Indian shamans were important to the structure of the tribe. Understanding the basics of tribal culture there is a need for the EU structure. Each group of Tejas nation which belonged Caddo, are traced through the female line, or matriarch, line. Each main group has a principal or chief xinesi. Each tribe had a chief or individual caddi. If the strain was very large, it has several canahas or sub-chiefs. There were priests in charge of religious ceremonies and even then there were medicine men or shamans.
    The Caddoan Indian shamans were called connas. These men (this view is almost always male) were the doctors of the tribe. They took care of the sick, the daily rituals, and worked on the wounded. They were charged with prophesy for the tribe, such as whether the hunt would be successful or if a marriage should take place.

  7. ential prud says:

    With the opening of the area,the public will get a better insight of the community and other details associated with them.Thanks for this update.The Cherokee County site consists of two temple mounds, a burial mound and a large portion of the adjacent village area.From this post we are able to get a picture of the group,how they lived etc. Look forward to hearing from you soon again.

  8. Granted, many worthwhile texts are available from honest and well-intended scholars who attempt to truthfully report the past. Most however, are woefully lacking in Spirit. Our stories are filled with Spirit because it gives them meaning and purpose. One must see a man’s heart to know him. It is seldom we read versions of our history that touch the heart and inspire our children. Few public and private schools today teach ‘real’ American Indian history. Less than a handful teach it from the Indian perspective. Why?

    The telling of stories is the essence of our culture. We must respect our ancestors and learn their stories to keep our ways alive for the sake of our children’s children.

  9. It is seldom we read versions of our history that touch the heart and inspire our children. Few public and private schools today teach ‘real’ American Indian history.

  10. I loved studying your articles. That is truly a terrific read for me. I have bookmarked it and I’m wanting forward to reading new articles. Sustain the nice work! This put up is precisely what I’m interested. maintain the nice work. we’d like more good statements.Before studying this publish i wasn’t conscious of the Caddos.Stay up for listening to from you soon again.The Cherokee County web site consists of two temple mounds, a burial mound and a large portion of the adjoining village area.Thanks for this update.With the opening of the area,the general public will get a greater perception of the community and other details associated with them.From this submit we are in a position to get an image of the group,how they lived etc.

  11. I enjoyed reading your articles. That’s truly a terrific read for me. I’ve bookmarked it and I’m wanting forward to reading new articles. Sustain the great work! This publish is precisely what I am interested. maintain the great work. we’d like more good statements.Before reading this post i wasn’t conscious of the Caddos.Look forward to hearing from you quickly again.The Cherokee County website consists of two temple mounds, a burial mound and a large portion of the adjacent village area.Thanks for this update.With the opening of the world,the public will get a greater insight of the neighborhood and other details associated with them.From this publish we are capable of get an image of the group,how they lived etc.

  12. Hi there,
    I have read many books related to american history but never thought about this aspect of it.Wonderful read it is.
    Thank You,

  13. Mind blowing read..I am going to share this story to my Facebook homepage its for sure.
    thank You for sharing such a nice read.

  14. Dennis Larry says:

    The Caddoan Indian shamans were important to the structure of the tribe. Understanding the basics of tribal culture there is a need for the EU structure. Each group of Tejas nation which belonged Caddo, are traced through the female line, or matriarch, line. Each main group has a principal or chief xinesi. Each tribe had a chief or individual caddi. If the strain was very large, it has several canahas or sub-chiefs. There were priests in charge of religious ceremonies and even then there were medicine men or shamans.

  15. A man’s country is not a certain area of land, of mountains, rivers, and woods, but it is a principle; and patriotism is loyalty to that principle.

  16. The tragedy of life is not so much what men suffer, but rather what they miss.

  17. Thanks for this update.With the opening of the area,the general public will get a greater perception of the community and other details associated with them

  18. Ryby Smith says:

    Thanks for the update regarding Caddo. I have really enjoyed reading this article. Again Thanks for sharing your article. Just love it!!

  19. Looking forward to read more of your posts. I like to read about the historical facts of US. Thanks and congratulations for so nice blog.

  20. Thanks for this update.Before reading this post i was not aware of the Caddos.Also like the comment “A man’s country is not a certain area of land, of mountains, rivers, and woods, but it is a principle”. Great concepts. Thanks for the great information.

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